Jump to content


Photo

Help me building a PC


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Zen3001

Zen3001

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:23 AM

I really need to get something better than this craptop and now with that crappy job I got I might even be able to afford it in a few months maybe.

 

Don't need any deals I can look for them myself just tell me what it is I need to buy, I know about mother boards, CPUs, graphic cards and RAMs because that's what everyone's talking about everywhere but what other components do I need to have full a working pc. Just give me a full list of things I need to buy and maybe a short description of their purpose.

 

That's all I know, buying a bunch of hardwares and putting them together, anything else I need to know?


Edited by Zen3001, 21 November 2018 - 11:17 AM.


#2 jaxa

jaxa

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1354 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:34 AM

https://pcpartpicker.com/

 

This site allows you to pick a bunch of components, gives you a price based on your preferences (tries to look for the lowest prices including coupons unless you blacklist/whitelist specific retailers, etc.), and lets you know if any compatibility issues arise. In other words, do you have the correct motherboard for a specific CPU, do you have a big enough power supply unit, etc.

 

The components you will probably need are:

  • Case
  • Motherboard
  • CPU
  • Fan aka CPU cooler (new AMD CPUs tend to come bundled with these)
  • GPU aka graphics card
  • Primary storage (hard drive or solid state drive)
  • DRAM aka memory (this component is massively overpriced right now)
  • Power supply unit (PSU). These have a number and ratings that give you an idea of their efficiency. So a 500 Watt PSU with an 80+ Bronze rating can reasonably be expected to supply up to 400 Watts to the whole system (80% of 500). You'll have to look up the difference between 80+, 80+ Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum, Titanium, etc. but in general you want to make sure that you have a PSU that can deliver more power than your other components need, and even more if you plan to do an upgrade in the future such as upgrading from a 100 Watt GPU to a 200 Watt GPU or whatever.

You may also need a:

  • Display aka monitor. Some people even use TVs for this purpose.
  • Keyboard and mouse (for the mouse, I tend to go with the Logitech M705 which is wireless, cheap, but pretty good)
  • Networking card (for Ethernet or Wi-Fi). More desktop users are adding Wi-Fi these days because it is convenient.
  • Secondary storage or USB storage device (for example, have your operating system and most applications and games installed on an SSD, and other stuff on an HDD).

In general, if your purpose is gaming, you want to spend more money on the GPU than the CPU.

 

Solid state drives seem very cheap this Black Friday.


Edited by jaxa, 21 November 2018 - 08:47 AM.


#3 OrbWeaver

OrbWeaver

    Mod hero

  • Active Developer
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7527 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:47 AM

My advice is: if you have to ask on a forum what components to buy for a home-built PC, you are better off not home-building at all. Home-building is a great option for experts who know exactly what components they want, and don't want to pay a vendor to put them all together, but for non-experts there is a high risk of producing a badly-designed machine that doesn't actually work out any cheaper than getting a pre-built machine from a custom vendor (not Dell or HP, but vendors that provide a high level of customisability for their gaming machines, like Cyberpower or PCSpecialist).

 

I certainly include myself in the category of "non-experts", as I did try to build my own PC once, and it just resulted in a hot, noisy, unreliable mess. By all means do it if you particularly enjoy the learning experience, but don't automatically assume that it is the best way of getting a good value PC just because it's what hardcore overclockers on Tom's Hardware do.


  • Judith likes this

#4 jaxa

jaxa

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1354 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:56 AM

My advice is: if you have to ask on a forum what components to buy for a home-built PC, you are better off not home-building at all. Home-building is a great option for experts who know exactly what components they want, and don't want to pay a vendor to put them all together, but for non-experts there is a high risk of producing a badly-designed machine that doesn't actually work out any cheaper than getting a pre-built machine from a custom vendor (not Dell or HP, but vendors that provide a high level of customisability for their gaming machines, like Cyberpower or PCSpecialist).

 

I certainly include myself in the category of "non-experts", as I did try to build my own PC once, and it just resulted in a hot, noisy, unreliable mess. By all means do it if you particularly enjoy the learning experience, but don't automatically assume that it is the best way of getting a good value PC just because it's what hardcore overclockers on Tom's Hardware do.

 

I disagree. Sites like PC Part Picker that I linked above make it dead easy, and help to avoid rookie compatibility mistakes. Moreover, the actual building of the system has become an easier and more streamlined process than it was 10 or 20 years ago, and there's always YouTube if you get stuck on how to assemble the thing.

 

As for the price, you may be right but I'm not sure. You may be able to pick up a refurb deal for far cheaper, and upgrade specific components later.

 

W.R.T. the hot noisy mess, this could be alleviated by not attempting to overclock anything, and having sane components (e.g. an AMD Ryzen CPU, and a lower-powered GPU such as the GTX 1050 Ti or 1060 instead of a 1080).


Edited by jaxa, 21 November 2018 - 08:58 AM.


#5 Zen3001

Zen3001

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 09:54 AM

The reasons I'm looking forward to build it my self is to be able to upgrade it in the future without having to buy a whole new pc and I'm pretty sure it gets a little cheaper that way, besides I know a few ameteur kids that did and had no problems



#6 OrbWeaver

OrbWeaver

    Mod hero

  • Active Developer
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7527 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 10:31 AM

The reasons I'm looking forward to build it my self is to be able to upgrade it in the future without having to buy a whole new pc and I'm pretty sure it gets a little cheaper that way, besides I know a few ameteur kids that did and had no problems

 

You don't need to home-build in order to have an upgradable PC, any professionally-built custom gaming PC is perfectly upgradeable (essentially it is a home-build PC, just with someone else rather than you doing the building).

 

I don't have any specific data on the price though; if Jaxa says it has become easier and cheaper in the last few years he is probably right, since the last time I tried it was in 2001 or so. In theory if everything goes well and you don't make any mistakes with components etc, it should work out cheaper because of simple economics (you're not paying for any labour costs, just raw components), although on the other hand the companies might be able to get better prices on the components because they are buying in bulk.



#7 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 10:39 AM

If you want platform for upgrades, get the best CPU you can afford, and pair it with proper mobo and fast RAM, as big amount of it as you can. Don't buy the cheapest mobo around, as you want it to last for like 6-9 years. Get a good dedicated CPU heatsink + silent fan (stock coolers are usually rubbish), and properly ventilated PC case (possibly with silent fans as well). This way you'll only need to worry about GPU and not much else, which means upgrading only one component every 3 years or so.


  • OrbWeaver likes this

#8 Zen3001

Zen3001

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 11:15 AM

I was looking to get that ryzen cpu and apperently according jaxa it allready has a fan on it, do you still recommend another fan on it?



#9 Bikerdude

Bikerdude

    Mod hero

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20281 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 11:48 AM

Whats your budget, country and proffered tech retailer..?



#10 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 12:03 PM

I was looking to get that ryzen cpu and apperently according jaxa it allready has a fan on it, do you still recommend another fan on it?

 

I stick to Intel / Nvidia combo, and Intel has pretty loud CPU fans with heatsinks that look like this:

978218_5_f.jpg

 

 

Which is nothing in comparison to something like this:

625558_0_f.jpg



#11 jaxa

jaxa

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1354 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 12:17 PM

AMD Ryzen CPUs are pretty cheap and the included cooler is well-regarded, and makes the purchase an even better value. Just make sure the model you are getting actually includes a cooler, some of them might not have it.


Edited by jaxa, 21 November 2018 - 12:20 PM.


#12 stumpy

stumpy

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1870 posts

Posted 21 November 2018 - 08:13 PM

might need a sound card if the motherboard doesn't have a sound chip.

which also means a microphone and speakers.


Edited by stumpy, 21 November 2018 - 08:14 PM.


#13 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 22 November 2018 - 02:03 AM

All motherboards have integrated sound cards these days, but if you care for quality sound, I'd advise getting external USB audio interface, preferably not by Creative or Logitech (same applies to speakers).



#14 Bikerdude

Bikerdude

    Mod hero

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20281 posts

Posted 22 November 2018 - 09:04 AM

or get an old PCI or PCIe based Xfi card.. like I have in my PC.



#15 Bikerdude

Bikerdude

    Mod hero

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20281 posts

Posted 22 November 2018 - 09:07 AM

or get an old PCI or PCIe based Xfi card.. like I have in my PC.

But not the new ones above them, as the signal to noise ration is actually worse.

 

On the subject of old creative cards, I have all my old ones still,  AWE32, SB-LIVE 5.1, Audigy, Audigy 2, XFI and the SoundBlasterZ, but I went back to the Xfi as it has better SN ratio.



#16 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 22 November 2018 - 09:26 AM

or get an old PCI or PCIe based Xfi card.. like I have in my PC.

 

Nope, the motherboard and all other components generate noise and interference. If you want better sound quality, you need to have your audio interface outside the PC case. And again, don't buy Creative stuff. Even when they have decent hardware on paper, in practice it's still shitty e.g. because of drivers. They don't make too much effort, as they cater to gamers (mostly). If you want to invest in your sound a little, look for audio interfaces for musicians or home recording studios. Even the basic models will sound better than anything Creative spouts, and they're not expensive (e.g. Focusrite).



#17 Zen3001

Zen3001

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 07:02 AM

that's a subject that's starting to confus me now, I'm going to be using headsets anyways



#18 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 07:26 AM

So you can probably stick to an integrated sound chip and invest your money elsewhere.



#19 jaxa

jaxa

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1354 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 09:44 AM

2018? I think you can safely skip getting a dedicated sound card. Again, that's something that was much more relevant in the 90s.


Edited by jaxa, 24 November 2018 - 09:44 AM.


#20 Jetrell

Jetrell

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 09:49 AM

What OS would be best to use on this gaming system? I'm using Windows 7 but I keep hearing that it's being discontinued. I've used Linux but compatibility

issues keep me from really using it for my gaming computer.



#21 jaxa

jaxa

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1354 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 10:09 AM

You could dual boot Windows 10 and Linux, and try to play more games on Linux using Wine or Steam's new Wine fork.


Edited by jaxa, 24 November 2018 - 10:09 AM.


#22 Judith

Judith

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1730 posts

Posted 24 November 2018 - 01:36 PM

Except for exclusive Xbox One / UWP titles, no games require Win 10. DX12 support is tied to Win 10, but so far it's always optional. You can go with Win 7 and optional Win 10 partition, if you want to have all options covered.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users