Jump to content


Photo

The Next Step After Steam...


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 SneaksieDave

SneaksieDave

    QA Lead

  • Development Role
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10125 posts

Posted 22 December 2004 - 11:48 AM

http://www.imediacon...m/news/4818.asp

First, we get an OS that requires you to register it online (after which, they watch your every move - change your system? You need their permission (re-registration)). Couple that with games forcing you to use it and, well the result is obvious.

Next, a high-profile game comes out with a delivery and update (*cough* monitoring ;) *cough*) system known as Steam. Can't get online? Can't play the game. Can get online? Prepare to wait and do it their way. Fair enough - piracy is rampant, and they are right to try to stop it. But... does it work? Not really. The game is still pirated. So ultimately (yawn, as usual) and ironically those who suffer with new innovative ways to kill the fun are those who paid money for it.

Well gang, say hello to Nielson! That's right, you can soon look forward to a bunch of new games peppered with Pepsi and K-Mart ads, and that require you to be online to play them, so they can UPDATE the ad-content while you play!

Exactly the reason some of us want to fight against innovations like (but not limited to) Steam. :)

#2 Vadrosaul

Vadrosaul

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 706 posts

Posted 23 December 2004 - 02:16 PM

I agree that STEAM is not very user friendly. It's only an infant product for online distribution, but the trend I hope it starts is where PC game developers can sell to the end consumer without the need of a retailer, and most importantly, without an overbearing publisher.

The online distribution model could shift power from Publisher to Developer.
Loose BOWELS are the first sign of THE CHOLERA MORBUS!

#3 sparhawk

sparhawk

    Repository Manager

  • Active Developer
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 21776 posts

Posted 23 December 2004 - 02:24 PM

I agree that STEAM is not very user friendly. It's only an infant product for online distribution, but the trend I hope it starts is where PC game developers can sell to the end consumer without the need of a retailer, and most importantly, without an overbearing publisher.

It's not really about user friendliness. It's also about control.

The EULA from HL2 says such nice things like that they can change their business model on short notice. I bet that almost nobody read that and in Germany the EULA has no legal binding anway.

But do you know what such a simple statement means?

If Valve decides that you played enough HL2 without paying, then they can charge you for it. And you agreed to it, by buying it, and by accepting the terms. In some countries they EULA might have a legal binding.
Gerhard




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users