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Radiatoryang

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About Radiatoryang

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  1. Huh? I don't... Okay, I enjoy Thief when I understand the level layout / patrol paths / obstacles and use them to my advantage. Are you trolling me, or do you really play Thief without thinking? In contrast, something like Serious Sam is a lot about reactions and reflex with not as much deep meditative thought. I want more people to like Thief, so I always err on the easier side of things and make levels more intuitive / accessible. That's my thinking.
  2. But don't you think this will be too hard for new (or average) players to perceive and understand? Or would you have a static fallback? And if so, isn't that a lot of content and balancing to do, considering most players play missions just once? It seems like dynamic patrols assume the player has habits they may not have yet. (And for the record, Randy Smith's GDC 2006 presentation comes out specifically against long static patrols and branching patrols, so there's one privileged perspective.)
  3. Serpentine: I agree that my use of affordance could use improvement, but I think "natural" is a problematic word. What is "natural" to a person? Norman wrote a 2010 essay ("Natural User Interfaces Are Not Natural") that I interpret as a "reversal" of his position, it seems like he dislikes the word too or at least how most people understand the word. You should read it and see if you come to the same conclusion. Instead, I'd rather push the idea that levels are functions of culture, not nature. (e.g. if you had never seen a European castle before, you might have a more difficult time playing
  4. Dynamic patrols might not be entirely random, but I argue the average player (i.e. one who rarely ghosts if ever, and they think Thief 3 on expert is pretty hard, etc.) doesn't know that. They don't see, "the guard must be hungry" -- instead, they show up in the kitchen they just scouted a few minutes ago and suddenly there's a guard there for some reason, despite no guards ever having been there for the past hour. There's no witnessed "cause" so it's random to the player, which is just as bad as technically random. And Komag's right, static is actually more "realistic"... though any quest f
  5. OrbWeaver: Yeah, I'm that same person, though now I disagree with everything in that article... online dating is just a search engine / private message system, NOT even a game system, and certainly not representative of any form of actual dating. Heh. Sotha: a "zero-failure path" is simply one that prevents the player from getting detected. It can go across metal plates, it can traverse bright areas, etc. It doesn't have to be safe by any means, just possible to execute without getting caught. And certainly equipment stabilizes players, but I think that's a well-explored idea. The idea that
  6. Static. - The player usually won't be there when they deviate from a patrol path. It'll seem random to the player. It's only "realistic" if the player is there to witness it, and the guard says loudly, "I gotta pee"... otherwise it's the game being unfairly difficult. - It makes tracking guards much more difficult. As a map author you might be able to ghost your entire level, but put yourself in the player's shoes. They might creep around a bank vault, only to find out you didn't place any guards there -- except for 2 that randomly deviate towards the vault. - Dynamic patrols can work, but o
  7. In 2006, Randy Smith presented a framework for making Thief levels. He didn't have a snappy name for it though, so I've re-branded it as "valence theory" and I've posted a summary of his presentation, as well as my personal additions to the theory. http://www.blog.radi...t-or-randy.html As active players or developers of a first person stealth game, I would appreciate your comments / thoughts. .. also: hey, whaddup
  8. Not to hijack the thread or anything, but my planned Thief-alike in Unity would get made under the following design constraints: First person only. I'm a purist, but perhaps only in this respect.Web browser deployment with short load times, works on all platforms.A gameplay mechanic with "social" stealth. I like how Hitman and Assassin's Creed handle it, and it would make for interesting intersections with shadow-based stealth.Non photo-realistic, simple art style. Mostly flat colors, some occasional details. Relatively few textures. No lip-syncing, no facial morphs, no detailed conversations
  9. I'm pretty sure Brink is still using their heavily modified idTech4, so it's likely not to go GPL anytime soon. I'm thinking of making my own "Thief-like" framework for Unity... well, it's pipe dreams right now, but as I'm learning the tech it seems more and more doable. You can directly sample lightmap indices in the API! And if I do make it, I'd probably avoid this content-heavy art style... considering that most of the time you're watching guards from 30 feet away in near-darkness, it doesn't make sense for them to be modeled so realistically. Check back with me in a year... :|
  10. UDK and Unity aren't as difficult as you think. If you know your way around Radiant, you can definitely figure both those toolsets out. I urge you to try it. It's one tool out of many that you can use. Toolsets are only as powerful as the people who use them, etc. As far as players: Modders follow the players, and players follow the newest game / engine. That's the benefit of standalone formats over mod formats... instead of rummaging through your closet to look for your old Doom 3 DVD, which no one will do. Also, realize that TTLG was a very small player base to shoot for. (Or at least I
  11. Finally got around to this. Cool mission, but it seems like I wasn't the only one who got stuck...
  12. I'm in favor of adding SOMETHING to the mission downloader. Right now I download a mission based solely on the title and the author names. If I don't recognize the author, I don't bother. Or let the player sort missions by date released? It'd be great if there were a rating system and a "most downloaded" / "popular" filter, or maybe a "for beginners" list or a "recommended" list? I think some kind of content filter will eventually be necessary, if not right now, when you have a lot more missions in the database. Imagine someone playing Dark Mod for the first time and they see a li
  13. Wait, I'm trying to make similar rails for my staircase -- did you do that with patches?
  14. I'll need one for my FM... in a couple months.
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