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the visuals are not that bad in witcher 1 ... games dont have to be ultra realistic to enjoy them xD The only gripe i had with it where the clunky controls and that it sometimes crashes when auto

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It's quite hard at times, but, fair, I would say. Especially in Hydroponics, you struggle with some ammo poverty, but, after that, it gets better. And the part where you kill the brain of the Many short before the game ends is pretty hard too. And hectic. :)

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Actually, the Psi Reavers gave me a bit more headaches... in the end, I applied some speed hypos, and ran through the first wave, destoyed the stars and the brain, and then took care of some of the other enemies, and just dropped into the hole to not waste all of my ammo. 

That's what I mean, the fights are hard, but fair (I played on "Hard" difficulty). All very well designed, just like the rest of the game. In some, especially the more current games, the balance is to just throw everything at the player, so the people who need to rush through the gigantic games these days in 20 hours, without having to worry about supplies, are satisfied. That means that the people, like me, who take their time, and finish the games in 80 to 90 hours end up with loads, and I mean LOADS, of stuff, because the game is balanced for the ADHD player of today. System Shock 2 isn't like that at all. You HAVE to explore and work for your supplies. That's how it should be.

It also doesn't feature auto healing, and all that modern casual crap, of course, which is a huge plus too. Now imagine they'd do games like that in current graphics. Heaven. :) Well, one can dream... the reality is that they do extreme super graphics with 100 GB of texture data, and the gameplay is something I'd wipe my ass with. Silly season forever.

Did I mention I fell for another sale yesterday, and bought Far Cry 5, thinking it might be somethign I'd enjoy? I lasted until the first super duper massive shoot 'em up fire fight, then I was pissed off, and returned the game. 😄 Sad sad...

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6 hours ago, chakkman said:

It also doesn't feature auto healing, and all that modern casual crap, of course, which is a huge plus too. Now imagine they'd do games like that in current graphics. Heaven. :) Well, one can dream... the reality is that they do extreme super graphics with 100 GB of texture data, and the gameplay is something I'd wipe my ass with. Silly season forever.

Well, there is Prey 2017, which was pretty baller.

It's been maybe five years since I played SS2, so I'm pretty hazy on the details. Don't remember it being that hard, other than before you got a gun. I'd like to think I played it on the hardest difficulty.

But since you reminded me of it, I played the Marathon trilogy over the course of the past 8 years and man, those games were ruthless. Never was I as happy to pick up ammo in a shooter. Or reach a save/health station.

As far as new games go, finished Ori & The Will of the Wisps the other week. They sure gameyfied it a lot compared to the first one, but it's still really good. About twice as a long too.

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Don't get me wrong, Prey is awesome, I love it, but, I don't remember it as quite as well balanced. Think I also played it on quite a high difficulty, but, ended up with quite a bit of gear.

Don't want to say anything bad about Prey though, it's been one of the very few good games of the last decade. There's really nothing not to like about it for me.

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Yeah, no argument about the difficulty. They did try at least, by offering the status effects and weapon degradation and whatnot, but the same thing happened as with every other game of its kind, I finish with an inventory absolutely full.

45 minutes ago, chakkman said:

Don't want to say anything bad about Prey though, it's been one of the very few good games of the last decade.

I'd be curious to hear what others you might have in mind. I think the last decade was awesome; I whipped up a top 20 list to discuss with some people. and it was pretty effortless. Even with lumping some franchises together, since I couldn't choose.

Just for fun, this was my list I wrote in December of 2019. It's a rather long post, but it was fun coming up with it. I've since finished games that would probably make their way in there, such as Nier Automata, Kindred Spirits on the Roof, and maybe Return of the Obra Dinn.

Spoiler

#20: SUPERHOT (2016)

This consideration is like 99% for the VR version of the game. I've been to the local VR-game business a couple of times with my brother-in-law and this game is the king every time. While the core gameplay is fun enough on a desktop setting, having to use your whole body is just a revelation. If I actually owned the VR version, I could probably have placed it higher, but needless to say, if you ever get the chance to try VR, this is the game to go for.

#19: Doki Doki Literature Club (2017)

Cute, horrifying, concise, meta. It's definitely an experience and shows what a creative mind can muster in the world of visual novels. It's not for everyone due to its imagery and content, but for me, it was a total surprise and utterly unforgettable.

#18. Gunpoint (2013)

Side-scrolling stealth game. Kind of arcadey in its design, as in, the levels are typically single-screen, but there is still a satisfying complexity to the gameplay. Avoid guards, hack doors, use gadgets, just fun stuff. It's short, but so much fun that I've played it a couple of times now.

#17. The Last of Us (2013)

Rare PS exclusive to make its way to my list. Not that I own one, but my brother-in-law does, so this was a co-op playthrough, despite being a single player game. While it was fun, being such a story-driven and cinematic experience, it would've certainly left a bigger impression if played alone. Also, while I still don't much like the controller, the gun-play is satisfying. Weapons have that meaty weight to them. Graphically gorgeously vibrant, the city overrun with greenery makes for a great setting.

#16. The Room Trilogy (2014/2016/2018)

Atmospheric point-and-click puzzle games at their best. A constant sense of discovery as your dwell deeper into the narrative. The first game just has the one room and the mysterious box, while the second and third stretch over multiple locations. Occasionally you click the screen in frustration, but not very often.

#15. Bioshock 2 / Bioshock Infinite (2010/2013)

To this day I'm not sure which Bioshock game is my favorite. The original from 2007 still holds up and I imagine that is the favorite for most people, simply because entering Rapture for the first time is a powerful moment. In the sequel, that same magic is obviously gone, but I reckon most everything else is just as good if not better. Gameplay-wise the ability to dual-wield weapons and abilities is a welcome change and the story at least tries to be original, instead of essentially retelling the story of System Shock 2. Bioshock 2 also has the added bonus of Minerva's Den DLC, which is a neat little mini Bioshock experience.

As for Infinite, I very much enjoyed the switch from the gloomy Rapture to the utopian Columbia. The gameplay is still fun, albeit downscaled, and Elizabeth makes for a lovely companion. The level design is disappointing, though, being much too linear. The story gets real crazy and the Dishonored-esque DLC brings something new to the old formula.

Regardless, a fun franchise of games and I'm sure I'll keep returning to them in the future.

#14. Dishonored / Dishonored 2 (2012/2016)

When it comes to modern stealth games, Dishonored is at the top of the line. While the gameplay can be too easy when going full ghost, it's still fun. Additionally, the world design is excellent. Like Bioshock, I'm really not sure which one of these I prefer. The first one has a way better story, while the second might have slightly better gameplay and level design. Add in the sizeable DLC for both games and over the course of everything, you get to play as four different characters, giving a new look into the world and different stories to experience.

#13. Qbeh-1: The Atlas Cube (2014)

A serene first-person puzzle game about block manipulation. The core gameplay is stimulating enough, but I love the added secretive elements that reward you with more gameplay. I'd love to try this in VR just to admire the scenery.

#12. Rocket League (2015)

It's soccer with cars. I don't game a lot with other people these days, but the majority of the 600 hours I put into Rocket League was spent with some family members. While I don't have a lot of interest in it anymore, it was quality time regardless.

#11. Prey (2017)

While System Shock remake and SS3 are on their way, Arkane Studios (Dishonored devs) decided to take a crack at making a System Shock -experience for the modern audience, by re-imagining 2006's Prey. It's not a remake or a reboot, though. As far as I know, they share the name and that's about it. Both are FPS's with horror elements, I suppose. Anyway, the resulting Prey 2017 is a beautiful rendition of the SS setting. A massive non-linear space station, lots of weapons and powers, alien scum and hours and hours of fun. It has it all. My biggest issue is the enemy design, as coming from the disturbing mutated crew of SS2, the black goopy tendril monsters of Prey don't have that same level of dread or charm. Still fun to shoot at, though. I also appreciated their attempt at adding some old-school hardcore gameplay elements, like weapon degradation and lingering status effects. As a veteran of FPS games, I love a challenge.

#10. The Swapper (2013)

Made by a couple of Finnish students, this is a small, but brilliant example of one my favorite game combinations: puzzles and atmosphere. While its 4 hours don't hold a lot of the former, it's oozing with the latter. The sound design is excellent and the hand-crafted backgrounds make for an amazingly desolate deep space experience. One of the finest showcases of indie game development.

#9. Ori and the Blind Forest (2016)

I'm not really a side-scroller fan, but Ori won me over with its gorgeous visuals and top-notch music. The gameplay is fun too, as you get to explore the sizeable forest finding new upgrades and powers. Metroidvania-style I believe, although it's probably not as claustrophobic. Add to that the moving story and it's potentially surprisingly emotional experience.

#8. League of Legends (2009)

Release years be damned, this was one of those decade-defining games, both globally and for me personally. After having Halo be my competitive fixture for years, it was fun to find another long-lasting one early on in this decade. It drives me insane, but I just can't stop. The Esports side of it is also sometimes more fun than actually playing the game.

#7. The Dark Mod (standalone release 2013)

A little history lesson to start. The Dark Mod officially released in 2009, as a total conversion mod of Doom 3; essentially, it's a Thief game made with the Doom 3 engine. In 2013, however, they made the jump to an independent release, meaning they replaced all Doom assets and most importantly, made it so that you don't need Doom to play it anymore.

I caught on to Dark Mod a little late, as I only found out about it a couple of years ago, but that suits me, since I had a boatload of missions waiting for me. Essentially, it's good old fashioned Thief-gameplay; no RPG-elements, no bullshit, just your basic thieving tools and your wits. It's the sequel to Thief 2 (or Thief 3) we should've gotten. While being a fan project means the mission design varies greatly in quality and content, they've still fostered a creative community where it doesn't feel like any work is out of place (well aside from that one that was garbage). To this day I check their site and forums almost daily to see if new missions are out; maybe I'll try creating one myself some day. Seeing as the Thief franchise may be dead after the Thief 2014 reboot failure, The Dark Mod is the best we've got (other than fan missions for the classic Thiefs, which I also play). And you know what, I'm fine with that. If the big studios won't make what the fans want to play, might as well do it ourselves.

#6. The Witness (2016)

It's clear at this point that I love puzzles and atmosphere, but if you add in an expansive, non-linear environment, then we're really in business. The Witness gives you essentially nothing, as you're thrust into the strange island filled with puzzles. You just gotta figure it all out, while occasionally listening to philosophical musings, or watching strange video clips; perhaps a little Richard Feynman or obscure art film this time. Add to that the fact that there's no music to distract you and it's really a one-of-a-kind experience.

#5. Antichamber (2013)

Oh boy, more puzzles. Antichamber is bizarre and that's why I love it. You never know exactly what kind of mind-fuckery they throw at your way next. Anything from platforming to non-Euclidian geometry goes. Like The Witness, the setting is very abstract, and visually much more so. Similarly, it has little to no music and offers philosophical motivational messages as you progress. Additionally, it might have the best map system of any game, super easy to get around if you get stuck with a puzzle. It is non-linear, after all. It's also much shorter, so it's easier to replay.

#4. Portal 2 (2011)

Back when Valve made video games, they made one called Portal, which was pretty fun. Then they upped the ante on basically everything, added new mechanics and characters and made Portal 2, which is a masterpiece. Unlike the other puzzle games on this list, it's not about atmosphere or philosophy, but gameplay and comedy. And man if it isn't fun and funny. Wheatley is one of the best characters of all time. Extremely replayable too, since experiencing the story multiple times is good enough fun. Add in the excellent co-op multiplayer, and you get a whole other dimension to the gameplay.

#3. Mass Effect 2 (2010)

Back when Bioware made good games, they made a series called Mass Effect, which has then gone on to the dumpster. But back in the day, it was the shit and they really nailed it with the second part of the original trilogy. While the gameplay is greatly streamlined in terms of RPG-mechanics, the fun of shooting at people isn't. More importantly, it has the best story of the three games, spearheaded by your immensely memorable and lovable crew of misfits you are tasked to hire. Add in the several fun DLC and you've got a thrilling space opera at your disposal.

What comes to the third game in the trilogy, that too is really good; it's mostly the ending that kind of falls on its face, especially when you delve into it in feature-length YouTube videos. But additionally, it too has a bunch of DLC I would like to play to fully evaluate the experience, and I haven't even bought those yet.

#2. The Talos Principle (2014)

First-person. Atmosphere. Puzzles. Add in a hefty dose of philosophical themes, player freedom, secrets, beautiful environments and music, and you've got the absolute masterwork of puzzle games and the highest benchmark I'll be judging others by for the coming years. How do you even make a puzzle game that takes 40 hours to beat and doesn't get boring at any point? And then release a brilliant 20-hour long DLC to boot. It's hard to even believe this game exists, but I'm so glad it does. Can't wait to play through it in VR, just so that I can take in the environments as if I was actually there.

#1. Deus Ex: Human Revolution (2011)

There was a time when I mostly cared about Halo and only sparsely ventured into other games. Then came 2011 when I, somewhat impulsively, bought Human Revolution, based on a couple of promotional videos. And man if it didn't turn out to be a revolutionary (hue) experience. It's entirely thanks to this game that I ever got to many of the other games I've mentioned and raved about.

Human Revolution is a mix of FPS and stealth with heavy RPG-based progression mechanics, as you gain new augmentations as a transhuman super agent. The story in the near future cyberpunk world has it all, from shady megacorps, to massive class inequality issues and before you're done, you've been around the world and back again. The gameplay is extremely satisfying, no matter the style, and the world design is stylized in a way that makes it hold up visually years later. Finally, the soundtrack is an absolute masterpiece, up there with the best of the best of all time. In terms of fun, atmosphere and emotional resonance, it doesn't get any better than this. That last room was like the hardest choice I ever had to make in my life.

Who knows what awaits this franchise in the next decade. Mankind Divided didn't do too well, which seems to be a theme with Deus Ex games (original - masterpiece, sequel - sucked, HR - masterpiece, sequel - ehhhh). It wasn't a bad game, just too similar mechanically, didn't do much with its story, and tried to nickel and dime fans with idiotic microtransactions. Maybe the series will once again lay dormant for a while before a new studio will raise it from the dead.

 

Edited by roygato
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While I would agree on some games on your list (and I don't know about half of them, because I simply didn't play them :)), I'd also say, with the exception of the Arkane Studios games, there are some games on the list which fit at least partly into the "professionally produced game for the mass" category.

Let's take the two Deus Ex games for example: While I definitely enjoyed playing them (a lot actually), I have no illussions that the first Deus Ex was another league, in terms of creativity and game design. Thief, Deus Ex, System Shock, those were games where you literally can feel that the developers have been turned loose, in terms of creativity. That's also something Ken Levine, who mainly designed the first Thief, System Shock 2, and the Bioshock's, always said about how he thinks development should be like: To animate the people involved to develop ideas. If I take a look at the Deus Ex reboots, I can see rudiments of the first Deus Ex, but, I also can say a lot of things which I rather connect to modern games. Long cinematics, the focus on design and good graphics, or the pretty penetrant political correctness story scheme of Mankind Divided. You know, the gameplay of the games was good, but, there are also quite a few things I didn't like so well about the games. Won't complain though, as I thoroughly enjoyed both Human Revolution and Mankind Divided. Even though they ARE modern games indeed.

IMO, the time of Thief, System Shock and Deus Ex kind of marked a peak time of games for me. A point where games really got great. Nowadays, there's always a focus on professionality, meaning that the game has to be tailored towards the mass, with a certain budget. Game development these days rather seems to me like they sat together in a meeting room, and said to each other "Well, guys... let's have a brain storm, what are your ideas?" "Mh, Ok, here is my idea: [...]" "Mmmh... that's a great idea, but, the audience wants to see this and that, so let's change it a bit. What's next then?" "Ok, here's another idea: [...]" "Mmmh... sounds nice, but... we gotta make money with the game, because the budget is $100 million, so, let's rather do it like this." And so on. All safe play, compared to "unleashing the creative beast", like they did in the past. And that's basically what made the games so good IMO. People having great and crazy ideas. If you take a look at Thief or System Shock, there are some things which are outright nuts in these games, and yet they work, opposed to many things in games these days. In one word: Nowadays games' simply bore me, for the most part, as they're so predictable. Take the Ubisoft games, for example, they all play and feel the same.

Anyway, you definitely didn't choose the boring AAA games for your list, and, as I said, there are some good ones. Even some great ones, like Dishonored and Prey, which, apart from Fallout 4, definitely also were my favorites in the 2010's. Still, if I take a look at the 2000's, or late 90's, there's loads of great games in those decades...

Oh... and last but not least, what I also always notice about nowadays' games is how little they make you think. Just finishing System Shock 2, I can say, there are some really tough decisions in the game, in terms of sklling your character, and also times where you wonder where you have to go, or what do next and where. Keeps you busy, apart from the shooting. ;)

Edited by chakkman
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31 minutes ago, chakkman said:

While I would agree on some games on your list (and I don't know about half of them, because I simply didn't play them :)), I'd also say, with the exception of the Arkane Studios games, there are some games on the list which fit at least partly into the "professionally produced game for the mass" category.

Let's take the two Deus Ex games for example: While I definitely enjoyed playing them (a lot actually), I have no illussions that the first Deus Ex was another league, in terms of creativity and game design. Thief, Deus Ex, System Shock, those were games where you literally can feel that the developers have been turned loose, in terms of creativity. That's also something Ken Levine, who mainly designed the first Thief, System Shock 2, and the Bioshock's, always said about how he thinks development should be like: To animate the people involved to develop ideas. If I take a look at the Deus Ex reboots, I can see rudiments of the first Deus Ex, but, I also can say a lot of things which I rather connect to modern games. Long cinematics, the focus on design and good graphics, or the pretty penetrant political correctness story scheme of Mankind Divided. You know, the gameplay of the games was good, but, there are also quite a few things I didn't like so well about the games. Won't complain though, as I thoroughly enjoyed both Human Revolution and Mankind Divided. Even though they ARE modern games indeed.

That's fair. Personally, I'm young enough that I didn't play the likes of Deus Ex, Thief and System Shock 2 when they were new; like I noted in my summary of Human Revolution, it's pretty much that game alone to thank that I started branching out and got into some of these other ones. HR was a completely new world for me.

I'd be hard pressed to choose between the first Deus Ex and HR. Both are excellent. Mankind Divided was a disappointment, the story just didn't go anywhere and it's maybe too similar to HR in terms of everything else. Not to mention the idiotic micro-transactions.

31 minutes ago, chakkman said:

IMO, the time of Thief, System Shock and Deus Ex kind of marked a peak time of games for me. A point where games really got great. Nowadays, there's always a focus on professionality, meaning that the game has to be tailored towards the mass, with a certain budget. Game development these days rather seems to me like they sat together in a meeting room, and said to each other "Well, guys... let's have a brain storm, what are your ideas?" "Mh, Ok, here is my idea: [...]" "Mmmh... that's a great idea, but, the audience wants to see this and that, so let's change it a bit. What's next then?" "Ok, here's another idea: [...]" "Mmmh... sounds nice, but... we gotta make money with the game, because the budget is $100 million, so, let's rather do it like this." And so on. All safe play, compared to "unleashing the creative beast", like they did in the past. And that's basically what made the games so good IMO. People having great and crazy ideas. If you take a look at Thief or System Shock, there are some things which are outright nuts in these games, and yet they work, opposed to many things in games these days. In one word: Nowadays games' simply bore me, for the most part, as they're so predictable. Take the Ubisoft games, for example, they all play and feel the same.

Sure, when the budgets are high and there is the never-ending race to top the latest best-seller, it's a tough sell for AAA studios to innovate.

31 minutes ago, chakkman said:

Anyway, you definitely didn't choose the boring AAA games for your list, and, as I said, there are some good ones.

There's a reason for that: I don't really play AAA games. :awesome: All the AAA games I played from the last decade are on the list, at least mentioned, save for Halo 4. As my list shows, I'm a huge fan of certain types of games (atmospheric puzzle, stealth, immersive sim, good stories), and AAA studios rarely deliver on that front.

31 minutes ago, chakkman said:

Oh... and last but not least, what I also always notice about nowadays' games is how little they make you think.

You say that, but the last room in HR took me like three hours. :awesome:

But I get what you mean. Certainly in the world of AAA, it's a bigger issue. I get a lot of thinking from all the puzzle games, lol.

Edited by roygato
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like both the new and the old prey though they have little if anything to do with one another, the old prey was crazy fun and the story was something you could not imagine in a million years xD the new one while also decent had some rather annoying moments like when in space navigating through tons of debris it was pretty darn impossible to get your barings, i actually ended up dying from lack of oxygen because i could not find my way back inside xD

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Regarding AAA titles, I would also add Witcher 3 as a very good game. It was very open worldy and had its fair share of senseless activities to keep the player busy for a longer time, but the story of the main and most (if not all; it has been some time since I played it) side quests was very good. The DLCs were also quite extensive

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love the witcher series :) though the first one was quite different playstyle wise and also a bit buggy.

Actually liked witcher2 more visually but that might be because the ssao effect bugs out on my old R9 390 in witcher3 causing checkerboard pixels on foliage (newer drivers dont help unfortunatly).

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I am glad that I played these games in order, even though I started the first one around the time the third came out. A friend of mine started with Witcher 3 and was not able to play the other two, because the graphics were too outdated (especially in the first one, the second is still good enough, I think)

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12 hours ago, Destined said:

I am glad that I played these games in order, even though I started the first one around the time the third came out. A friend of mine started with Witcher 3 and was not able to play the other two, because the graphics were too outdated (especially in the first one, the second is still good enough, I think)

I picked up the first Witcher enhanced edition for free on GOG at some point, and picked up the enhanced/GOTY editions for the other two recently for about $13 total. Now I'm ready to play it in 2023.

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the visuals are not that bad in witcher 1 ... games dont have to be ultra realistic to enjoy them xD

The only gripe i had with it where the clunky controls and that it sometimes crashes when autosaving, the story is rather good actually.

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I agree that graphics are not everything and the story was great. Otherwise I would not have finished the game... In general, I really like the world. I have not finished all the books, yet, but only miss one or two (not sure right now).

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17 hours ago, revelator said:

The only gripe i had with it where the clunky controls

This is what I tend to hear as well, when it comes to the Witcher series. I don't have an interest in it myself, but my brother-in-law was (or maybe still is) playing the third one, and was telling me how it's apparently very difficult.

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like most games with this playstyle it is very gear dependant, though mutations also help somewhat :)

If you like a tank style build get the bear gear and you will be neigh unkillable unless ofc you screw up.

The nice thing about the bear gear is that it will autocast queen shield and with some mutations you can even recover from fatal blows with full hitpoints. I do prefer the wolf style gear though as it is more all round 3 different oils on each sword and insta cast grenades. The 3 different oils is a bit odd though seing as the steel sword only has one oil xD

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Frankly, I never really was a friend of the Witcher games. IMO, most hyped games and developer ever. I much more enjoy the Bethesda RPG's.

I really got slight hatred when I saw all those side quests just luring on the side of the roads, when you move through Witcher 3's game world, just to see that your level 9 character needs to be at least level 48 to do the quest, ARGH! Can a RPG have a worse design flaw? Not to talk about the lore which wasn't my cup of tea, or the magic stuff which wasn't my cup of tea. Or the characters, which weren't my cup of tea.

Anyway, to each his own, I guess there's a lot of people who enjoy the games as they are.

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you can take on higher lvl monsters but as anything it is not recomended ;)

dont know about hype the story is good though :) still it is not 100% faithfull to sapowskys books so people who read those might have a hard time swallowing some of the stuff in the games.

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It's often like that. Stories for games or movies will be "sexed up". :) I recently read a couple of Tom Clancy books. Those are very different to the movies as well. Much more realistic. More like the older Tom Clancy video games.

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On 3/21/2021 at 1:34 PM, chakkman said:

I much more enjoy the Bethesda RPG's.

How do you view the post-Morrowind world of Bethesda RPGs? The common opinion I see is that they're fun to explore, but pretty not good in terms of everything else (writing & combat specifically). I've only ever played Oblivion, couple of years ago, debatable if it was worth it.

What I do like about it, is that it produced this brilliant retrospective. If you have five hours to spare, I highly recommend it.

 

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Bethesda is not only Elder Scrolls. Apart from that, I think both Oblivion and Skyrim are much better in terms of combat than Morrowind ist. Morrowind is basically hack hack hack, and the character skill and luck logic of the game decides whether you hit or not, and how powerful the hit is. I found Oblivion pretty generic in terms of game world, and the characters, but, Skyrim did that a lot better. I also never really could get into the text based dialogues in Morrowind. And, I also think it has a much more generic world than Skyrim.

There are a few things in Skyrim which I don't like, like, some of the die quests are pretty repetitive and boring, but, overall, it's the most "round" experience of the Elder Scrolls games.

I don't mean this offensive, but, I always find it a bit funny when there are people doing videos about how Morrowind is so much better, and now the games got dumbed down, and stuff. While I agree that there ARE games these days which are quite dumbed down, and, I also find that some of the game mechanics have been dumbed down in Skyrim (I really think that no game should have automatic healing, for example), I can only refer to games mag's scores about the games. 

Anyway, the real hit series from Bethesda for me is Fallout. Those games offered one of the most fun experiences I ever had in games. Simply because the setting is nearly perfect for me. I also like Elder Scrolls, but, between those two series, I prefer the Fallout setting. Bethesda used to do pretty generic game worlds and characters (Morrowind, Oblivion, even Fallout 3 suffered a bit from that, especially the never ending subway tunnels), but, at the latest from Fallout 3, they really improved a lot on that.

If you want to play an Elder Scrolls game, play Skyrim Special Edition. I wouldn't really play anything else now.

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