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New release: 0.9.5


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Unfortunately, it didn't work on the system without VC++ redist installed. It does go further though; before this change it would bomb out immediately, but now it shows the DR splash screen, gets past "searching for modules", and then fails at "initialising modules."

 

The application error log is (consistently):

 

Faulting application darkradiant.exe, version 0.0.0.0, faulting module msvcr80.dll, version 8.0.50727.42, fault address 0x0000461a.

Well, then these DLLs apparently aren't suitable for generic shipping. Hm.

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Will there be a linux build put up for this release? For some reason I can't find any of the older .deb packages on the darkradiant site. The one link I can find is broken. Compiling it myself seems like too much... there are several libs and dependencies needed to build it, which aren't named exactly what they are because I'm getting them for Fedora, and I'm getting stuck on some that have their own dependencies which have their own dependencies and now I seem to have found myself in dependency hell.

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I haven't made a DEB since I haven't yet sorted out the dynamic dependency problems (specific Boost versions) which would make the binary useless for many people. If people are keen to get the DEB I can look into this again.

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I've put an Ubuntu 6.06 (or later) DEB in the SourceForge file group for this release. It installs and runs OK on my system, but I haven't done extensive testing so it is possible there could be problems on other systems (in particular I'm not sure what happened to the Boost dependencies, which no longer appear in the ldd output).

 

Note that this DEB was produced from a revision close to the release date of the original 0.9.5, and is not a snapshot of the latest features.

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OK so I wasn't pleased with Fedora (which I just installed the other week) so I switched over to Ubuntu 7.10. I d/l'd all the libraries and such and compiled 0.9.5. Everything appears to be working-- but I'm getting a very weird bug. It seems random, but sometimes when I press certain keys (ctrl, alt, etc) to do things in DR, the DR window inexplicably grows wider. I'm running it windowed with detached views and they aren't touched, but the main DR window keeps growing. If I don't resize it it quickly grows into the next desktop and it doesn't stop there as I keep mapping. Weird?

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Yes, I already saw that bug myself. It's happening only in Linux, and it's due to the tooltip text being displayed in the lower left corner when you hit the modifier keys. The suggested fix was to make the tooltips an option for people experiencing these problems.

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OK so I wasn't pleased with Fedora (which I just installed the other week) so I switched over to Ubuntu 7.10.

Congratulations, you are now running a Linux distro that isn't crap. RPMs = infinite fail. :ph34r:

 

:P

 

(Yes I am qualified to say this - we use Fedora at work. *hairball cough*)

My games | Public Service Announcement: TDM is not set in the Thief universe. The city in which it takes place is not the City from Thief. The player character is not called Garrett. Any person who contradicts these facts will be subjected to disapproving stares.
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Haha. Yeah... it turns out that everything I need my computer to do is easier to set up / run from Ubuntu than Fedora. I had Doom 3 + Darkmod and DarkRadiant running in half an hour with Ubuntu... in Fedora... Doom 3 and Darkmod eventually worked but DarkRadiant was impossible...

 

Oh well. I haven't touched a Linux machine in 5 years so this one's good for me it seems.

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Haha. Yeah... it turns out that everything I need my computer to do is easier to set up / run from Ubuntu than Fedora. I had Doom 3 + Darkmod and DarkRadiant running in half an hour with Ubuntu... in Fedora... Doom 3 and Darkmod eventually worked but DarkRadiant was impossible...

 

Oh well. I haven't touched a Linux machine in 5 years so this one's good for me it seems.

 

Yeah, Ubuntu is definitely easier than say SuSE. SuSE works fine until you start trying to install other programs (that have no RPMs) or try to update your SuSE distribution to the next version. It never really works

 

In Ubuntu, so far every update/upgrade/install worked. :D

"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)

 

"Remember: If the game lets you do it, it's not cheating." -- Xarax

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Congratulations, you are now running a Linux distro that isn't crap. RPMs = infinite fail. :ph34r:

 

Having used (and developed with) both RPM and DEB, I would agree with you except for one area: if an RPM cannot be installed due to unsatisfied dependencies, at least you are told up front. With dpkg, the DEB is installed, removing the old version, and then it tells you that the dependencies are not met, leaving the package in a broken state.

 

Needless to say, this is highly unsatisfactory if you want to upgrade a core system library like GTK or Glibc. I had to restore a system from a backup after inadvertently getting it completely hosed due to this problem.

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Having used (and developed with) both RPM and DEB, I would agree with you except for one area: if an RPM cannot be installed due to unsatisfied dependencies, at least you are told up front. With dpkg, the DEB is installed, removing the old version, and then it tells you that the dependencies are not met, leaving the package in a broken state.

 

Needless to say, this is highly unsatisfactory if you want to upgrade a core system library like GTK or Glibc. I had to restore a system from a backup after inadvertently getting it completely hosed due to this problem.

 

But this is only an "interface" problem, e.g. with dpkg, and vanishes if you use a more "clever" front-end for installing, right? Does Adept (the KDE GUI frontend) or the Gnome version do the right thing here?

 

As for RPM, after SuSE incorporated Zen, all things went bad. It can't just be described how bad. And this isn't RPMs fault, but the fault of the absolut horrible Zen interface in front of the RPM system.

"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)

 

"Remember: If the game lets you do it, it's not cheating." -- Xarax

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But this is only an "interface" problem, e.g. with dpkg, and vanishes if you use a more "clever" front-end for installing, right?

 

No, it's an issue with the low-level design of dpkg, which is called by all of the front-ends to perform the actual package installation. It is true that the front-ends will perform dependency-resolution up front and will refuse to install a package whose dependencies are not met, but this does not help you if you have an actual .deb file which you want to install locally.

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No, it's an issue with the low-level design of dpkg, which is called by all of the front-ends to perform the actual package installation. It is true that the front-ends will perform dependency-resolution up front and will refuse to install a package whose dependencies are not met, but this does not help you if you have an actual .deb file which you want to install locally.

 

Uhm, why not? I always install local deb files by using a front-end (whatever konqueror actually uses when it installs this deb file) and I would think that would go through the same dependency-resolution-first strategy, too?

 

In any event, all these "use the console and type the following:" advises you see on the net are really not useful to Ubuntu (and linux) novices alike. One of these days one of them will contain ";rm -fR /" and chaos breaks out :D

"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950)

 

"Remember: If the game lets you do it, it's not cheating." -- Xarax

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Having used (and developed with) both RPM and DEB, I would agree with you except for one area: if an RPM cannot be installed due to unsatisfied dependencies, at least you are told up front. With dpkg, the DEB is installed, removing the old version, and then it tells you that the dependencies are not met, leaving the package in a broken state.

 

Needless to say, this is highly unsatisfactory if you want to upgrade a core system library like GTK or Glibc. I had to restore a system from a backup after inadvertently getting it completely hosed due to this problem.

Yikes, seriously? That is pretty crap. Hope that one gets fixed at some point.

 

I did manage to ruin a Debian system using apt-get once (to the extent that it chucked a kernel panic when attempting to boot), but that was entirely my fault. I was being a little too free with the --force option. It did warn me. :P

My games | Public Service Announcement: TDM is not set in the Thief universe. The city in which it takes place is not the City from Thief. The player character is not called Garrett. Any person who contradicts these facts will be subjected to disapproving stares.
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Uhm, why not? I always install local deb files by using a front-end (whatever konqueror actually uses when it installs this deb file) and I would think that would go through the same dependency-resolution-first strategy, too?

 

Oh yeah, those simple front-ends probably do dependency checking first. I was thinking more of the complex front-ends like Syntaptic, which AFAIK do not provide a means of installing a local package at all.

 

Yikes, seriously? That is pretty crap. Hope that one gets fixed at some point.

 

I wouldn't count on it, it seems to be by design. It is so you can install multiple interdependent packages at once -- first everything is unpacked, then the dependencies are checked before the configuration stage.

 

I suspect the Debian developers would just tell you not to try installing system libraries from local packages in the first place.

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