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Is it possible to compile DR on windows without running VS?


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I'd like to be able to compile it, but I can't run VS to save my life at this point. Credentials gone stale (as always), and still being on Windows 7 is making it impossible to fix them (though it would be a nightmare anyway).  

So I need some other way, but I don't know enough about compiling C++ to know what to do. 

I tried with cmake, but it didn't compile. I got a whole bunch of errors just like this one:

CMake Error at C:/CMake/share/cmake-3.29/Modules/FindPkgConfig.cmake:681 (message):
  pkg-config tool not found
Call Stack (most recent call first):
  C:/CMake/share/cmake-3.29/Modules/FindPkgConfig.cmake:847 (_pkg_check_modules_internal)
  CMakeLists.txt:54 (pkg_check_modules)

 

Edited by Skaruts

My FMs: By The Cookbook

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You could try installing the Windows Subsystem for Linux and see if you can get a Linux build working on Windows. However I have no idea if WSL is comprehensive enough to allow you to build and run GUI apps using wxWidgets and OpenGL. I suspect it would be a fair amount of work to get the CMake build working, since it's never been tested on anything other than a regular Linux installation (AFAIK).

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What???? You're on Windows 7, from 2009, with updates that ended 4 years ago.

Windows 10 Pro key is like 20$.

Why do you feel it's fair to expect Microsoft to continue to support an OS that's 4 versions out of date? I really don't like defending M$, but in this case, this is a little much.

I hope your Linux experiences are better than mine were, as even on bog standard hardware it was nothing but crash city and bugs on 3 different distros.

I always assumed I'd taste like boot leather.

 

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I'd still be on XP if they hadn't dropped support.

5 hours ago, AluminumHaste said:

Why do you feel it's fair to expect Microsoft to continue to support an OS that's 4 versions out of date?

I didn't say anything to that effect. I just grew to hate having to keep switching OS due to their business model that keeps imposing that. Been doing that for nearly 30 years now.

I don't expect Linux to be paradise. I just hope it's less infuriating than MS products. 

Either way, that's besides the point here. 

My FMs: By The Cookbook

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I upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10 for free. Does that not work anymore?

If your objective is to keep running the same OS version for 15 years, I'm afraid you won't find Linux any better — as far as I know even Long Term Support releases don't go beyond 5 years unless you're a business who pays for extended support, and even that probably wouldn't give you more than 10 years.

On the other hand, Linux upgrades are always free (assuming you're not using RHEL or another commercial distro), whereas Microsoft might require you to purchase an upgrade license.

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17 hours ago, Skaruts said:

I didn't say anything to that effect. I just grew to hate having to keep switching OS due to their business model that keeps imposing that. Been doing that for nearly 30 years now.

Given updates from Windows 7/8 to 10 and from 10 to 11 have been free, it seems like a low-impact financial decision on the part of the end user. I mean I'm tired of MS's BS and complications too and don't like a lot of the changes in newer versions of Windows, but I found workarounds and solutions to all the common issues and felt it was a better outcome than relying on EOL software that's going to be harder and harder to maintain especially when software/hardware vendors no longer support it. Still, if you find Linux is an option then it's better than a system that no longer runs anything without major issues.

/sidetrack

A word of warning, Agent Denton. This was a simulated experience; real LAMs will not be so forgiving.

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None of this is relevant, though. I will be switching OS and experimenting at some point, but I have other priorities to worry about in my life and no willingness to be adding that on top right now.

Meanwhile, this is what I have to work with, and I'm trying to find out if there's a way I could still compile DR with it.

@OrbWeaver I could use virtual box to run a linux distro, but could I compile to a windows executable from it? (I presume I can't.)

Edited by Skaruts

My FMs: By The Cookbook

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42 minutes ago, Skaruts said:

I could use virtual box to run a linux distro, but could I compile to a windows executable from it? (I presume I can't.)

I can't say for sure that it's 100% impossible, but I've never heard of anybody doing it and would have no idea how to go about it.

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You can download the build tools independently of VS: Buildtools for Visual Studio 2022. If you can still install those on Win7, you can maybe build DR with the command @stgatilov posted above. You might need to navigate to the directory where msbuild.exe is located first or even launch a developer console (which should be available in the start menu after you installed the build tools).

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9 hours ago, OrbWeaver said:

I can't say for sure that it's 100% impossible, but I've never heard of anybody doing it and would have no idea how to go about it.

Sure you can, it's called cross compilation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_compiler

In the Linux VM you'd install something like mingw-w64 and use that as the compiler, the output being a Windows exe. Of course the project would have to be set up to support it so I don't know if TDM is already set up for that.

A word of warning, Agent Denton. This was a simulated experience; real LAMs will not be so forgiving.

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For peeps coming from Windows with no desire to invest a lot of time in learning Linux and the command line (you have to anyway to a certain extend) I would advise Linux mint if you want a fixed release or Manjaro if you want it rolling. Although @revelatorhad good experience with Solus.

You can already start using it now in a multi-boot setting.

On 2/26/2024 at 2:00 PM, Skaruts said:

but I have other priorities to worry about in my life and no willingness to be adding that on top right now.

Meanwhile, this is what I have to work with, and I'm trying to find out if there's a way I could still compile DR with it.

So you are willing to invest time into figuring out some obscure way to get it working instead of invest time in a proper solution for the future.

Why do you need to compile a Windows version, instead of a Linux version?

I guess you could ask someone with Windows 10 to compile it for you?

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Aye solus has been rather fun to dip into :) most games work quite well with it also (still you will need some wine fu to get everything running if you mainly play windows games, that said steam and Lutris makes it atleast pretty manageble).

you should still be able to upgrade to win10 for free if you get the win10 media creation tool from microsoft (you can also upgrade to win 11 if your hardware is supported -> needs a TPM module and atleast a gen 8 cpu).

im still on a gen 6 so no win 11 for me unless i hack it (you can disable the hardware check with a registry key but only if upgrading from a previous version).

If used to Win7 the interface in Win10 can be a little daunting with its massive live tiles, if you cant stand how it looks get something like openshell which will bring back a more standard start menu with easy access to the old control panel.

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As for distros -> Solus due to it being one of the few that works well with my hardware (does not offer the same ammount of packages most other distros do as they test each of them extensively for stability issues before they go into the package manager).

Linux Mint seems to be pretty liked as well.

OpenSuse probably the best for cross development.

Manjaro should also be pretty good for gaming.

Arch Linux for its massive package database (can be a bit hard to setup) Msys2 is based around the arch package manager so should be good for cross development to.

Zorin OS if you want something close to windows (had a few rather annoying bugs with Lutris on it the last time i tried it though).

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On 3/1/2024 at 9:51 AM, datiswous said:

So you are willing to invest time into figuring out some obscure way to get it working instead of invest time in a proper solution for the future.

Switching systems is a longer term time and effort investment than a way to compile a program. Especially because I am willing to invest some time learning linux.

On 2/29/2024 at 6:31 PM, JackFarmer said:

Which distro are you likely to switch to?

Mint, probably. I don't have any strong preferences, I just want something reliable and low maintenance, where I can focus on work.

My FMs: By The Cookbook

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Mint is pretty slick and intuitive. You might need to do a moderate amount of command-line wrangling, but it's manageable. TDM runs well on it too.

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I spend 90% of my time on Linux Mint. I occasionally pop over to Windows 10 to check a few things or run some updates but Linux Mint is my home. TDM runs better under Mint than Windows for me but your mileage may vary.

When running TDM in Linux, you must set FPS to "Uncapped Mode" in the Advanced settings, the old capped mode has terrible stuttering and performance under Linux ( even native Doom 3 has this issue ). You can set Max FPS to 60 if you are worried about any inconsistencies with game timing ( the only known issues are rare problems with audio behavior at really high FPS). Just don't use the native 60FPS capped mode, use Uncapped mode with a Max FPS value.

Please visit TDM's IndieDB site and help promote the mod:

 

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I like how this has essentially become a Linux thread despite it not being the intended focus. :)

I play around with Ubuntu MATE because I like Ubuntu and the MATE variant has an environment I prefer with a bunch of changes I like, a good compromise between old and new. That said, TDM behaves a bit oddly in Linux. For some reason in TDM it misses the occasional mouse click - if I happen to click fast enough there's a chance the event won't register. It seems to be something inherent to the Doom 3 engine in Linux - even in dhewm3, if I make a really fast click on the mouse it can sometimes ignore that mouse event and not fire the weapon. Generally you have to be really quick on the down/up event for it to happen, but it happens, it's reproducible and I can't just accept having to consciously be aware of my mouse behaviour and remembering to click long enough to guarantee the event is registered. I'm sure many won't notice this issue, but I'm pretty fussy about such things so it annoys me.

This doesn't happen on anything else in Linux, just Doom3/TDM. Not surprisingly Windows doesn't have this issue, and it's a good example of the reasons why I don't bother moving entirely to Linux. I can't stand odd quirks like this and there's odd quirks EVERYWHERE in Linux. There's quirks aplenty in Windows too of course, but I'm used to them.

 

A word of warning, Agent Denton. This was a simulated experience; real LAMs will not be so forgiving.

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4 hours ago, nbohr1more said:

When running TDM in Linux, you must set FPS to "Uncapped Mode" in the Advanced settings, the old capped mode has terrible stuttering and performance under Linux ( even native Doom 3 has this issue ). You can set Max FPS to 60 if you are worried about any inconsistencies with game timing ( the only known issues are rare problems with audio behavior at really high FPS). Just don't use the native 60FPS capped mode, use Uncapped mode with a Max FPS value.

This is completely new info for me. But I was already using uncapped mode for a while

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